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Recently we were introduced to an extraordinary new premium members-only webstore named Dymant. The initiative brings together beauty and utility, tradition and innovation, know-how and design, heritage and future. Each creation is made following the idea of ‘temps juste': the time needed to achieve perfection. As a result, every object offered requires many hours of patient and precise work, which can’t be rushed. Everything one finds in the elegant Dymant environment is the product of passion and the expertise of gesture mastered by talented craftsmen such as a cabinetmaker, a jeweler, engraver, lace-maker, glass blower. All limited-edition creations, combining traditional craftsmanship and contemporary design. On top of that, the fine products are reserved for Dymant’s private club members only, which are introduced by invitation only. When you become a member, you can welcome five persons to the club, making it potentially the perfect destination for incredible products, just for you and your personal circle. read more…

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We have been writing about the work of Swiss designer Tom Strala as early as 2009, when we discovered his extraordinary Pompidu lamp. Tom studied architecture at the ETH Zürich and obtained his Masters in Architecture with distinction in 2001. From the early stages Strala has been working in his studio. Since 2002 he runs his own showroom based in Swiss’ largest city Zürich, located in the well-known Seefeld area. Since 2008 Strala is registered as limited company and is continuously intensifying its local and international activities within the world of art and architecture. Today Strala is recognized as design pioneer questioning established values and nurturing new ones. Strala’s spirit is one of a seeker, constantly challenging himself to dive deeper into understanding, exploring from different perspectives only to unveil what lies behind surfaces and to get closer to the bottom of things, wether it’s the material or forms he works with. The results are minimal, robust designs always with elegant touches and lines, which we highly admire. read more…

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‘Mid-Century Modern Complete’ by Dominic Bradbury, published through Thames & Hudson can be seen as the definitive survey of one of the most popular, collectable and dynamic periods of international design. With over a 1000 illustrations, it is a must-have for any design aficionado, collector or reader seeking inspiration for their home. It offers a comprehensive overview of all aspects of the subject: furniture, lighting, glass, ceramics, textiles, product design, industrial design, graphics and posters, as well as architecture and interior design, use of innovative and affordable materials and forms of mass manufacture, and newly developed precepts of ‘good design’. Nearly 100 major and influential creators of the mid-century period are highlighted from Scandinavia, Western Europe, America, Japan, Brazil and Australia. They include icons such as Saul Bass, Robin Day, Charles and Ray Eames, Marimekko, Isamu Noguchi, Dieter Rams, Lucie Rie and Paolo Venini, as well as architects Alvar Aalto, Philip Johnson, Richard Neutra and Oscar Niemeyer. Very inspirational! read more…

Love this — Casalinga ceramics on Bloesem.

Heineken Pop up store for the Central European Fashion Days by Kiss Miklós, Budapest on Retail Design Blog

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Inspirational Melbourne-based Barbera Design was established by Australian designer Daniel Barbera in 2004, to create Australian-made furniture. High quality, unique, but above all timeless products, primarily aimed at Oceania and South-East Asia. Since the inception of his studio, Daniel and his team have been working with world class leading architects, specifying batch production products from their range, while also being able to offer custom solutions with existing products or bespoke pieces. Barbera’s product ethos works around logical design outcomes, and is process orientated working with old industrial processes fused with modern technology and craftsmen, to deliver elegant quality furniture which we really like. read more…

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Yesterday during Tokyo Designers Week designer Ronan Bouroullec and Japanese architect Kengo Kuma presented their collaboration for the East Japan Project which the latter started after the Fukushina disaster in 2011. The inspirational project aims to get the artisans of the region back on their feet by creating lifestyle products that are manufactured by the local craftsmen. One of those traditional objects combining aesthetics with craftsmanship are kokeshi dolls, which we’ve been collection for quite some years now. Inspired by the extraordinary dolls Ronan and his brother Erwan Bouroullec designed a series of kokeshi dolls which are exclusively produced for the East Japan Project. The Bouroullec brother’s interpretation moved away for the super enlarged head and has a more human shape, with its torso separated in two elements, connected by a hinge which allows them to bend at the hip area, resulting in a more modern, moveable, but nevertheless familiar kokeshi doll. Such an elegant interpretation of one of our favorite Japanese traditional objects. read more…

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The inspirational Torino-based art collective Nucleo, which is directed by Piergiorgio Robino, recently collaborated for the second time with Gabrielle Ammann Gallery for PAD 2014, the fair for 20th century art and design. With these last amazing creations by Nucleo, which were exclusively produced for the gallery, they explored the the symbiosis of wood and resin, while the new pieces also incorporate references to stone and metal fossils, resulting in the Nucleo’s representative blend of opposites; old and new, light and heavy, lost and strong and arousing the law of gravity and in their unique aesthetic which combines a highly futuristic sentiment with elementary organic forms. Stunning! read more…

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We are blown away by this extraordinary ready-to-wear collection by the Dutch designer Iris van Herpen, which she presented in Paris on September 30th of this year. For the collection van Herpen found inspiration in a visit to CERN’s Large Hadron Collider, whose deadly magnetic field exceeds that of earth’s by 20.000 times, forming the essential spark and motif for the collection which she named Magnetic Motion. The designer, who often joins forces with like-minded artists from other fields then fashion collaborated with Canadian architect Philip Beesley and Dutch artist Jolan van de Wiel, which resulted in a dream team for the exploration of the boundaries between nature and technology and a simply stunning collection. read more…

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Atelier Haussmann is a Berlin-based studio founded by brothers Rainer and Andreas Haussmann, who started their shared endeavor in 1990. Simultaneously with the foundation of the studio the brothers created the brand Mobile Metallic, and under the two flags they create both interior designs and exclusive interior products out of iron which are made to last a lifetime. The products of Atelier Haussmann evoke the sentiment of remembrance. The iron stool in a workshop, the steel tube bed, the bench in the locker room. Many pieces are based on designs from the past, reinterpreted for contemporary times. Through the combination of citation, the return to traditional production techniques and new ideas Atelier Haussmann developed its own aesthetic, keeping away from fast fashion phenomena, with a clear focus on products made with the highest quality possible, always remaining with a timeless presence. read more…

These are so nice! The Canteen Cup by ThisIsPaper.

Jennifer Bonner explores ordinary roof typologies in Atlanta – as seen on
Designboom

Love this distort yourself project by Bertrand Lanthiez & Chloé Curé on Designboom.

Beautiful soap shapes — Hygiene Gems as shared on Trendland.

If Batman rode a Buell 1125: The Ronin 47 on Bike EXIF.

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Cycling is a very significant part of the Dutch culture and it has been for many decades. However, an affordable, contemporary Dutch bicycle disappeared from our streets a while ago. The explanation is reasonably simple; a bicycle is a labour intensive product, and for this reason, almost all bicycle manufactures, and with them a lot of other fields of production, moved their production to low-cost labor countries, mostly in South-East Asia. This impressive graduation project by Design Academy Eindhoven alumni Bob Schiller, which he named Epo, aims to revive the local industry and bring production back to the Netherlands. We are very impressed by his design and attached ambition, which also gained him a nomination for the Keep an Eye grant which will be awarded to one graduated student on the 18th of October. read more…

Such a beautiful shelving system, designed by ARCHIEE for an exhibition at the Paris air show held at Salon du Bourget. As featured by Designboom