We love the latest covers of Art Review by John Morgan Studio – via It’s Nice That.

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Today is the launch of the latest Amsterdam-based project of Dutch entrepreneur Casper Reinders named Libertine Gallery. The store and gallery is promising to be a large cabinet of curiosities, filled with neon art, Art Deco, stuffed birds and a robot. Libertine Gallery, which will open its doors at the Prinsengracht 715 for the public officially tomorrow, is the result of a collaboration between the passionate art dealer Fredien Morel from Antwerp (sometimes referred to as master of curiousa), interior fanatic Danielle Pakes, Mark Chalmers and Casper Reinders. The new interior design shop and art gallery stood on the wish list of Reinders for quite a while and with this set of collaborators it finally materialised. read more…

This three-and-a-half-meters-wide excavation is the proposal for the impressive ‘Memorial sites after 22 July’ at Sørbråten, near Utøya, by the Swedish artist Jonas Dahlberg. As shared by David Report.

Crazy! This life-size model of fast-food joint, made entirely of wood, made for Apparatus, a recent exhibition at the Kuvi Gapta gallery in Chicago.

As shared on Wired

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The Lotus Dome by Daan Roosegaarde is a living Dome consisting of hundreds of ultralight aluminium foils that unfold in response to human behaviour. The high-tech work of art has been travelling the world since it was created in 2012. Having been on display at a number of historical locations abroad, the Lotus Dome is now facing a contemporary juxtaposition with the Rijksmuseum’s 18th-century period room. The Lotus Dome comes to life in response to a visitor’s body heat. Hundreds of aluminium flowers unfold, a deep bass sound fills the space and light projects the lotus flowers onto the walls. Roosegaarde calls it Techno-poetry. The smart Lotus foil was designed by Studio Roosegaarde and its designers. The foil is made up of different layers of Mylar, a type of polyester, which makes the leaves fold and unfold in response to light and heat. read more…

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Marc Giai-Miniet is a French artist who makes highly fascinating dioramas that tend to feature reproductions of human organs, crime scenes, submarines in basements, and our favorite: libraries. The libraries by Giai-Miniet are detailed and striking, replete with book cover art, author names, and identifiable typography. Occasionally a diorama’s title will conjure a loose narrative, an obscure starting point from which the viewer might further consider the art. Giai-Miniet balances the handcraft of tiny diorama with poignant explorations through memory, association, and dreamscape. His tiny homes, though dealing with images of mundane possessions, industrial equipment, and furniture, evoke a feeling that’s very surreal and a little sinister. read more…

When in the Netherlands, make sure to visit the Stedelijk Museum of ‘s-Hertogenbosch for this exhibition by Formafantasma – showing design made of animal products. From cow-bladder lights, fish-skin stools to plastic made of beetles. Sick!

The contemporary Swedish artists Malin Gabriella Nordin has made this beautiful book Private Language, as reviewed by Fine Little Day.

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Stratifications is a beautiful collection of five objects by Paris-based designer Krzysztof J. Lukasik, based on the complementarity between the simplicity of the designed forms and sophistication of the texture of the laminated marble. One of the goals of Lukasik was to rid marble of the heaviness it is often associated with in funeral monuments, making it more suitable for the modern interiors. The technique of laminated marble used by the designer is a way to break the massive aspect of marble by slicing it and also to use otherwise unused scraps, just like with glued laminated wood. Lukasik found this approach to the natural stone collaborating with an experienced stone mason. The outcome of the laminating of the marble allows to bring forth the graphic aspect of marble by breaking the linear pattern of the natural veining. The series of objects is somewhat an echo of the natural stratified appearance of marble as found in quarries, before being transformed. read more…

We definitely need this brass desk by Birgit Israel in our studio! Love it!

Better than the real coral (for multiple reasons) are these Metal Coral Sculptures made from bent and woven metal with a matte grey finish. Available at C.S. Post & Co.

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Recently we stumbled upon this amazing collection of invitations, programs, flyers, posters, and broadsides from the period 1985 to 1987 of the legendary New York-based Palladium nightclub via recto|verso. The level of creativity and diversity is truly astonishing. The Palladium was a cinema, concert hall and later a nightclub. Designed by Thomas W. Lamb and originally called the Academy of Music, it was built in 1927 across the street from the site of an earlier venue of the same name. Opened as a deluxe movie palace by movie mogul William Fox, the Academy operated as a movie theater and concert hall through the early 1970s. In 1985, the Palladium was converted into a nightclub by Steve Rubell and Ian Schrager. Japanese architect Arata Isozaki redesigned the building’s interior for the club. When Rubell and Schrager took over a new important chapter started for the Palladium as the heart of the New York art and music scene, exemplified by this wonderful collection. read more…

This is awesome! Our ancestors could spot natural predators from far by their silhouettes. Are we equally aware of the predators in the present-day? Test your skills with this Drone Survival Guide by Ruben Pater.

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Copenhagen-based photographer Adam Jeppesen’s work challenges the boundaries between documentary and fiction. He is seen as one of the greatest talents in contemporary Danish photography, and we discovered his work during the last Unseen Photo Fair, after which Jeppesen’s work by far resonated the most. His photographs inhabit a blurred territory where the real and the fictional become interchangeable. Even if the Danish artist seems to remain faithful to what is in front of his camera, he doesn’t seem to be too concerned about objectivity. The highly impressive work we saw at Unseen was part of the The Flatlands Camp Project. A series of work, recorded on a journey from the Arctic through North and South America to Antarctica. For 487 days Jeppesen travelled in solitude and from this long journey a series of melancholic, evocative landscape pictures have emerged. read more…

The amazing work of Nicole Coson, as shared on ‘I need a guide’.

“The thing that has always been very important in everything we do, is that although we like using technology, it’s never about technology,” Field talking to POSTmatter

Create your own white neon sign with this set of letters, numbers, and symbols by Michele Varian.

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Last week the fascinating exhibition called ‘8 artistes & la terre’ has ended at the London-based gallery Erskine, Hall and Coe. The exhibition has been one of the most popular exhibitions to date at the gallery, and was based on the namesake book, which was published by Argile Editions in 2009. All of the eight artists knew each other before they created their work, with Jacqueline Lerat functioning as the lead artist, which resonated in a direct influence in the creation of their individual pieces. Some of the pieces really stood out in our eyes. We love the beautiful and raw sculptures by Claude Champy and Daniel Pontoreau and particularly the dolmen-like work of Bernard Dejonghe. At the same time we are also highly attracted to the the beautiful shape created by Setsuka Nagasawa. read more…

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Last night at Fashion Week in Paris, heavyweight Raf Simons, succeeded thoroughly in surprising us and the rest of the world in a way reminding of his avant-garde days. Both the overall aesthetic and the impact of the event, in which Simons collaborated on a label tag-base with American artist Sterling Ruby make the collection destined to be the most talked about of the season. The collection is part Raf Simons’ signature immaculate tailored lines and part Sterling Ruby’s infatuation with aberrant psychologies. Presented in a form directly referring to the Punk/DIY patchwork Simons rose to fame with at the beginning of this century. Coats are collaged with pieces of fabric that seemed in an upward rush, about to fly off their foundation. Items are paint-spattered, bleach-splashed, a shark’s ravening maw can be seen, as a grasping hand with shiningly painted nails; “icons of consumption” according to Ruby. From the tailoring to these graphics; the show makes one realize how far ahead, and more importantly how much influence Simons has had, and very likely will have, on menswear. read more…

A lovely new limited edition print by Juan Chavarria on OCCUPY.

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Kristin Victoria Barron, a interior designer who founded the company KRIEST in 2005, recently launched a fascinating collection of classical, material-driven small scale sculptures and lighting inspired by the ‘aether element’, or dream world. Barron was influenced by both mythical archetypes and her own dreams to create the interesting collection. By honing her sculptural craft through mentor Vladimir Rodin, celebrated jeweler and painter whose work for Kieselstein-Cord is in the permanent collections of the Louvre and Metropolitan Museum of Art, Barron was able to create a unique collection of objects that act both functional and is aesthetically appealing. Barron crafted her debut collection in three categories: vessels, objects and lighting. read more…

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To celebrate the fact that the first Land Rover Defender was produced 65 years ago, Studio Job was asked to take this 4×4 in hand. In their own way, they have created an ode to the vehicle that makes many of us dream of adventures. Eventually, it has turned out to be more than simply a revised or upgraded vehicle. The result is a sculpture that questions escapism, power relationships and above all Studio Job’s own work. “Designing a car is the same as when, as a designer, you’re sometimes given the chance to redefine a hotel: it’s a higher goal. You don’t get such important commissions every day,” says Job Smeets, founder of Studio Job. “On top of that, Defender is an emotionally charged icon. We’ve approached that golden carriage in our own way, maybe not so much from the angle of this one car but rather from the phenomenon of the holy cow in general.” read more…

Amazing exploded views of classic sports cars by Fabian Oefner.

99 animals flock together in the Queensland Art Gallery in Qugoma, Australia. An amazing artwork by Cai Guo-Giang as featured on Designboom